An artist known for his musical integrity, technical assurance and intelligent, compelling interpretations, Christian Tetzlaff is internationally recognized as one of the most important violinists performing today.  From the outset of his career, Tetzlaff has performed and recorded a broad spectrum of the repertoire, ranging from Bach’s unaccompanied sonatas and partitas to 19th century masterworks; and from 20th century concertos by Bartok and Shostakovich to world premieres of contemporary works. In addition to recitals and soloing with the most prestigious orchestras around the world, he is also a dedicated chamber musician, as well as performing with his own Tetzlaff Quartet.

Christian Tetzlaff was a 2010-11 Carnegie Hall Perspectives artist, an initiative in which musicians are invited to curate a personal concert series in Carnegie and Zankel Halls through collaborations with other musicians and ensembles. Tetzlaff’s Perspectives included an appearance with the Boston Symphony during which he played concertos by Mozart, Bartok and the New York premiere of a new concerto by Harrison Birtwistle; a play/conduct performance with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s; a performance with the Ensemble ACJW led by Sir Simon Rattle; a concert with the Tetzlaff Quartet; and a duo-recital with violinist Antje Weithaas. He also led a Professional Training Workshop for young violinists and pianists, culminating in a young artist concert.

Tetzlaff’s highly regarded recordings reflect the breadth of his musical interests and include solo works, chamber music and concertos ranging from Haydn to Bartok.  His recordings include the complete Bach Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin for the Musical Heritage and Haenssler labels; Jorg Widmann’s Violin Concerto, written for Mr. Tetzlaff, with the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra/Daniel Harding for Ondine; among many others.  His most recent recordings are the three Brahms piano trios with cellist Tanja Tetzlaff and pianist Lars Vogt as well as the three Brahms sonatas for violin and piano with Lars Vogt.

Born in Hamburg in 1966, Tetzlaff began playing the violin and piano at age six, but did not begin intensive study of the violin until making his concert debut playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto at the age of 14 and attributes the establishment of his musical outlook to his teacher at the conservatory in Lübeck, Uwe-Martin Haiberg, who placed equal stress on interpretation and technique.  Christian Tetzlaff currently performs on a violin modeled after a Guarneri del Gesu made by the German violin maker, Peter Greiner.