One of Scotland’s most revered singer-songwriters and instrumentalists, the venerable troubadour made his name in the Scottish traditional folk scene of the 70’s with bands like the Tannahill Weavers and Silly Wizard before going solo with beloved hits like “Caledonia” and “The Gael.”

“Dougie MacLean is Scotland's pre-eminent singer-songwriter and a national musical treasure”- SingOut

A native of Perthshire, Scotland, MacLean has built an international reputation as songwriter, composer and extraordinary performer on his own terms. This has taken his performance to concerts and festivals all over the world and to the stages of Carnegie Hall in New York, London’s Festival Theatre and the Sydney Opera House. He has received two prestigious Tartan Clef Awards, a place in the Scottish Music Hall of Fame, a Lifetime Achievement Award from BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards and an OBE (Officer of the Most Excellent order of the British Empire).

After stints playing multiple instruments in some of Scotland’s finest traditional folk bands like the Tannahill Weavers and Silly Wizard in the 70’s, MacLean went out on his own and wrote what has become one of the unofficial anthems of Scotland, the epic ballad “Caledonia.” His subsequent records continued to embrace MacLean’s love for his homeland, its land and people. Albums like Craigie Dhu, Fiddle and Singing Land all helped establish MacLean as a proud ambassador of Scottish music. His stirring fiddle tune “The Gael” off his 1990 record The Search was chosen as the main theme for the iconic 1992 film Last of the Mohicans. Throughout the last twenty years he’s continued recording and touring, making his large musical presence felt on both sides of the Atlantic. His most recent album was 2018’s A Robert Burns Collection which set MacLean’s keen sense of melody to the poet’s works.